Weight is an enemy of the bike.”
Richard Hatfield, CEO of Lightning Motorcycles
The world’s leading expert on niobium technology, CBMM, and a US electric motorcycle company collaborate to design and incorporate innovative applications into various components.
Boost your speed and performance. Lightning Motorcycles, known for being pioneers in the e-mobility business and electric motorbike developers, teamed up with CBMM, the world’s leading provider of niobium goods and technology, to achieve this goal.
The cooperation with the Silicon Valley-based company was signed in January with the goal of leveraging niobium applications in the mobility sector and developing an electric two-wheeler to shatter the existing commercial motorbike Land Speed Record (LSR). The goal of the programme is to innovate and test metal in various car components in order to increase performance and eventually surpass the 250 mph (approximately 403 km/h) mark.
Niobium Battery – Fast Facts

Fast charging – NTO anodes can safely recharge lithium-ion batteries in as little as six minutes, putting Horwin’s sub-10-minute charge aim within reach.

Toshiba’s next-generation SCiB batteries, which use niobium titanium oxide anodes, aim for a 1.5-fold increase in energy density. This means you can get longer range out of the same size battery.

Streamlined – Smaller, lighter batteries with higher energy density can be employed, which enhances the remainder of the bike’s design. Alternatively, companies might occupy the same space with more people and have a longer range and more power.

Lower cost – Because NTO batteries are expected to last a long time, even when fast-charged, they should never need to be replaced: 20,000 charges, each with a range of 150 kilometres, equals 3 million kilometres.

Longevity – Existing SCiB batteries with LTO anodes have 20,000 charge/discharge cycles, and future niobium versions are expected to have the same endurance. During ultra-fast charging, NTO anodes experience less lithium metal deposition (which can cause internal short-circuits) than conventional designs.

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The plethora of rider aids available on today’s motorcycles would have been unfathomable even a decade or so ago, but Yamaha’s latest addition could be a game-changer, not only offering an extra layer of safety but also allowing for a rethink on steering geometry.

Yamaha’s electronic power steering (EPS) will be used in the All-Japan Motocross Championship for the first time on the works machines this year, but the system is set to be employed on a range of bikes in the future. It’s a rather small setup, but the fact that it’s computer-controlled means there’s a lot of room to expand its capabilities.  For motocross use, however, there’s more sense in that most straightforward element of the idea; anything that can reduce rider fatigue will be a benefit.

However, lowering the amount of effort required to turn the bars is only one part of the system. It also functions as an active steering damper, absorbing external forces so you don’t have to wrestle with the bars to keep them pointing in the right direction. Again, motocross is a rigorous test of the concept, but it may be useful for road motorcycles and other racing as well.

To figure out what you want it to do, the power steering uses magnetostrictive torque sensor technology from power-assisted bicycles. These torque sensors are used on e-bikes to detect when you’re pedalling and how hard you’re pedalling, delivering that information to a control computer, which interprets the amount of electric assistance required. It does the same thing here, but with the steering of the bike.

Similarly, increased trail, which would normally make for over-heavy steering, could be adopted, using the power assistance to make it feel light. Quite simply, the system could remove the shackles currently placed on designers by the compromise between stability and responsiveness.

The technology also means that the steering may be linked to the IMU, traction control, and cornering ABS, resulting in a holistic stability control system that controls throttle, brakes, and steering – all of the major rider inputs – to assist prevent accidents.

Yamaha’s MOTOBOT robot rider system has already demonstrated that computers can ride a motorcycle around a track, and the power steering system displayed here is the final piece of the puzzle in translating that knowledge into something that can be used on a real-world motorcycle.

Yamaha power steering

Sensing the power The magnetostrictive torque sensor measures the amount of force you apply to the bars and sends the data to a control computer.

Control by a computer : The computer calculates the amount of steering torque you want to apply and transfers the appropriate amount of power to an actuator ahead of the steering head, which turns the front wheel.

Keeping things on track : When external forces try to move the front wheel, such as bumps, the system recognises that the order didn’t come from the bar inputs, therefore the actuator resists the movement and acts as a steering damper.

Simple but clever : The entire arrangement is extremely compact and does not necessitate a new frame, fork, or headstock redesign. As a result, it should be simple to implement. Yamaha say the plan is to “equip EPS on various motorcycles in order to provide a wide range of riders with greater motorcycling fun, safety, and comfort.”

Time to perfection : As on cars with power steering, there’s still a physical connection between the bars and the front wheel so you don’t lose control if the system fails.

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Except for annual fluid bleeding and pad examination or replacement, modern motorcycle brakes require little maintenance. Changing pads is a simple afternoon project, and if you buy high-quality ones, you’ll get better performance for less money. Check your pads with a ruler or a calliper if they appear to be too small. It’s time to replace them if there’s only two millimetres of material left. Here’s how to take care of your brake pads and callipers.

Remove Your Callipers :

aliwheels remove callipers

Although the callipers fastened to the forks can be used to change brake pads, it’s preferable to remove them so you can thoroughly inspect all of your braking components. Begin by putting your bike on a centre or rear stand to support it. It’s beneficial to be able to spin the front wheel for access, therefore leave the fork free to turn. After that, release the pad retaining hardware with the calliper in place. Any retaining pins and clips are included in this. Then unbolt the calliper and remove the old brake pads, making a mental note of their orientation and any spring plates or spacers that may be present

Scrub & Clean Everything :

aliwheels clean callipers

Although the callipers fastened to the forks can be used to change brake pads, it’s preferable to remove them so you can thoroughly inspect all of your braking components. Begin by putting your bike on a centre or rear stand to support it. It’s beneficial to be able to spin the front wheel for access, therefore leave the fork free to turn. After that, release the pad retaining hardware with the calliper in place. Any retaining pins and clips are included in this. Then unbolt the calliper and remove the old brake pads, making a mental note of their orientation and any spring plates or spacers that may be present.

Push Your Pistons Back In :

aliwheels push piston

Remove the master cylinder—or rear brake cylinder if you’re changing the rear brake pads—reservoir cap and record the fluid level to press your pistons back in. Using your fingers or the old brake pad, gently press the pistons back into the calliper body. As you press in the pistons, the reservoir will fill with fluid; wick it off with a paper towel or draw it off with a syringe so it doesn’t overflow and spill all over your bike.

Dress Your Rotor :

aliwheels dress rotor

Dress the rotor with a red Scotch-Brite pad and brake cleaner, then a clean rag while the calliper is still off. The goal is to remove any filth and glazing so that the new pads can settle into a clean surface. This is an important step that you should not skip!

Install the New Brake Pads : 

aliwheels install brake pads

Install the new brake pads—noting the direction marked on the pads—in the caliper then reattach the caliper and torque all fasteners according to the service or owner’s manual. Pump the brake lever and check the brake fluid level. Now would be a great time to bleed your brakes, but otherwise, reinstall the reservoir cap.

Ride & Bed Your Pads :

aliwheels ride and bed brakepads

Start with a few hundred stops at greater speeds to break in your new pads. Your brake rotor must have a layer of new brake pad material on it to work at their optimum. When you slow down and stop, this will reduce brake squeal and vibration. Also, keep in mind that your new pads may not be completely mated to the disc for several hundred miles.

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Hybrid cars are quickly becoming the standard as a stepping stone to complete electric power, and there’s growing speculation that bicycles will follow suit.

In 2030, it will be unlawful to sell new cars in the UK that are solely powered by fossil fuels, with combustion-engined vehicles being phased out five years later. Even if no particular regulation is passed, the pressure on bikes to follow suit will only grow as the deadline approaches.
Kawasaki has already committed to a quick expansion of their battery-powered lineup, with plans to introduce a significant number of hybrid and pure-electric models, while Yamaha now appears to be revisiting the concept of hybrid motorcycles.

In this field, Yamaha was a pioneer. It debuted two hybrid-powered designs in 2005: the Gen-Ryu, which paired an R6 engine with an electric motor in a low-slung tourer, and the HV-01, which was a more conventional scooter.
In 2007, Yamaha introduced the Luxair hybrid idea, and in 2009, the HV-X showcased a near-production hybrid system in a maxi-scooter, combining a 250cc single and a 20hp electric motor — just as the global financial crisis slashed R&D resources. The company’s enthusiasm for the concept has resurfaced.

The old Yamahas were parallel hybrids, with the gasoline engine and electric motor operating the rear wheel separately or in tandem.

Yamaha’s new designs, on the other hand, have a hybrid drive system with a small petrol engine acting as a range-extender generator to recharge the batteries.

In 2020, a patent for such a bike was issued, and now new documents revealing three hybrid designs have been released.

The smallest is a 125cc scooter with a low-mounted petrol engine/generator, a battery under the seat, and an electric motor in the swingarm. The petrol-powered generator component is bolted to elastic mounts so vibrations don’t reach the frame or rider because it doesn’t need to move the back wheel.

The single-cylinder engines lack the power and torque to provide usable performance on their own, but they can trickle-charge the battery by running at their most efficient rpms.

Warm combustion engines are more efficient; cool electric engines are more efficient. Yamaha’s designs demonstrate a variety of radiator configurations that might be used to attain this purpose.

The following concept is a maxi-scooter with a TMAX-style chassis, with the petrol engine and generator situated forward of the electric motor between the rider’s legs and a traditional chain or belt drive to the rear wheel.
Finally, there’s a motorcycle with a small petrol engine mounted high up, just below the steering head, and a big electric powertrain filling the space where the engine and transmission would typically be.

#Yamaha #Aliwheels

The single-cylinder engines lack the power and torque to provide usable performance on their own, but they can trickle-charge the battery by running at their most efficient rpms.

Warm combustion engines are more efficient; cool electric engines are more efficient. Yamaha’s designs demonstrate a variety of radiator configurations that might be used to attain this purpose.

The following concept is a maxi-scooter with a TMAX-style chassis, with the petrol engine and generator situated forward of the electric motor between the rider’s legs and a traditional chain or belt drive to the rear wheel.
Finally, there’s a motorcycle with a small petrol engine mounted high up, just below the steering head, and a big electric powertrain filling the space where the engine and transmission would typically be.

 

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When switching from a conventional bicycle to a motorbike, you’ll need to take your time and develop your skills, just as you would with clutch lever control.

Because street motorcycles are so much heavier than the pedal bicycles most people are used to, their braking power and sensitivity often astounds them.

When it comes to braking, motorcycles differ from automobiles. Because both brakes should not constantly be used, the vast majority of motorbikes have separate front and rear brakes.

FRONT BRAKES

The front brake is operated by a hand lever on the right side of the handlebars. It will be extremely beneficial to your riding career.

Some of my students have told me that they were taught not to use the front brake because it is risky. Only riders who don’t know how to use the front brake are at risk.

On a typical motorbike, the front brake provides 70 percent of the stopping power, and much more on high-performance style bikes. This occurs as a result of weight shifting to the front tyre while braking.

Some riders may regard the front brake as unsafe because no one taught them how to utilise it properly.

When applying the brake, use all four fingers, just like you did with the clutch, and be sure to return them to the hand grip when you’re done.

There should be very little dead zone movement in the lever while applying the front brake, so be cautious right away. You always apply brakes, not grasp them, regardless of the situation.

When teaching pupils how to operate the front brake, one of the techniques I teach them is to apply pressure on the lever one finger at a time.

  1. This avoids using too much pressure right off the bat and makes the brake application more predictable.
  2. There are techniques that allow you to use your front brakes while in a turn however as a new rider it is in your best interest to avoid using the front brake when turning.

 

  REAR BRAKES 

#Aliwheels #RearBrakes #Rear #Brakes

The rear brake is located just ahead of the right footpeg. Although the rear brake does not have the same stopping force as the front brake, it is more adaptable and vital.

Although the rear brake only provides about 30% stopping power, it can be employed in practically any situation that requires slowing and stopping.

The brake is simple to operate. All you have to do is use the ball of your foot to gradually apply pressure on the brake control. The rest is just a matter of getting used to it.

The rear brake has a dual purpose: it may be used to balance the bike and make it easier to manoeuvre at low speeds, making it ideal for parking lots, low-speed residential neighbor hoods, and so on.

CLUTCH AND BRAKING EXERCISE

  1. You will need a paved flat roadway or parking lot.
  2. Pick up where the earlier exercise left off: ready position with the bike in gear.
  3. Instead of only partially releasing the clutch you will be slowly releasing the clutch all the way, so that the bike may start moving and pay attention to where in the clutch travel path the bike starts to inch forward.
  4. Make sure to put your left leg back onto the peg once you are moving.
  5. Be sure that both hands are back on the hand grips
  6. Go about 15-20 ft
  7. Pull in the clutch
  8. Apply both brakes evenly and gradually until you come to stop. Don’t forget to put the leg back down when you stop.
  9. Practice only putting your left leg down as you should be using your right foot for the rear brake.
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That’s how you can do a burnout on a motorcycle in only 9 easy stages.

Step 1: Stand Without Putting Pressure On The Tires:

Locate a barren location. Put on your helmet and go on your bike.
You must first settle your posture before beginning the burnout. By resting your feet flat on the ground, you may stand straight and upright. You can’t put too much weight or pressure on the bike while standing over it.

The tyres will be unable to establish traction as a result of this. Tires aren’t supposed to have much traction. This is due to the fact that during a burnout, a motorbike with too much traction accelerates in the forward direction on its own.

Step 2: Start The Motorcycle:

You must start the bike by placing the key into the ignition ON mode when you have finished configuring your position. You must keep the motorcycle in neutral gear at all times. Now it’s time to fire up the engine. The motor will now warm up because you inserted the key into the ignition mode.

Before trying a burnout on the motorcycle, it is necessary to warm up the engine. You must keep the engine in neutral gear until it has properly warmed up. The engine must run for at least 5 minutes before attempting a burnout. It must be fully warmed for 5 minutes.

Step 3: Pull The Clutch Lever:

Now you must grasp the clutch lever with four fingers tightly. Then drag it back to the handlebars. The clutch lever can be found on the left handlebars. If your motorcycle’s clutch is located on the right handlebar, you must grab and pull it with four fingers using the same approach.

Step 4: Hold The Front Brake

You must now use your fingers to play! Grasp the front brake with your right middle finger. This means that you must use your right hand’s middle finger to engage the front brake. At the same time, you must maintain revving the motorcycle’s engine’s throttle. You can accomplish it by tightly gripping the front brake with your right hand.

We recommend that you only use your right middle finger to pull the brake lever backwards. This is because you’ll need the rest of your hand to rev the engine throttle. If your motorcycle’s throttle is on the left side, however, you should use your left middle finger to squeeze the brake lever.

Step 5: Shift The Motorcycle Into First Gear

You must transfer the motorcycle into first gear at this point. You can do this by using your foot to click the gear shift pedal. To keep the motorcycle from moving into gear, you must engage the clutch with your left hand.

Step 6: Rev Up The Engine:

Presently it’s an ideal opportunity to rush the motor by firing up it. There is a red line set on the measure meter. You need to fire up the motor until the bolt arrives at a point which is somewhere around 75% near the red line.

You can do as such by turning the choke down utilizing the right hand. At the same time, you need to watch out for the RPM (reiterations each moment) measure and check assuming the bolt has arrived where it ought to.

You should begin firing up the bicycle’s motor at a low speed. Or, more than likely the motor may be in gear mode and it might begin moving without help from anyone else, which can prompt a mishap. Additionally, you need to recollect heating up the motor prior to placing it into gear with the goal that the tire can turn at a fast to get some foothold.

Step 7: Slightly Bend Your Posture In The Forward Direction:

You can’t put a lot of weight over the back tire. From now on you should somewhat slender your body forward. Besides, you need to stand stable alongside keeping your feet level.

This will assist you with applying minimal measure of tension over the back tire. Its vital to put less strain over the back tire or, in all likelihood it might achieve footing and cause a mishap.

Step 8: Release The Clutch:

Presently to do the burnout, you need to relinquish the grip. You don’t need to dial down the grip for withdrawing it. All things considered, let it off by pulling out each of your fingers from the switch inside a second.

Thereafter the bicycle’s motor will change into first gear. Alongside that, the back tire will start pivoting and turning quickly. Accordingly a burnout will be made.

Step 9: Conclude The Burnout By Re-engaging The Clutch And Releasing The Throttle:

Presently you need to set the choke by pulling out your fingers free from over it. All the while, you need to reconnect the switch of the grasp. That will finish up the burnout. For reconnecting the grip switch, you need to pull the switch with your left hand.

This will prevent the motor from remaining in the initial stuff and shift it into nonpartisan. Thereafter, utilizing your right palm, roll the choke in reverse. In any case, you need to make sure to keep the brake squeezed the whole time. This will make the back tire stop moving, and this will keep the cruiser from speeding up advances.

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If you’re conducting a big restoration, customization, or bottom-end work on your motorbike, you’ll need to remove the engine from the frame.

How to Take a Motorcycle Engine out of the Frame

The following are the steps involved in removing a motorbike engine:

1) Completely drain the oil.

2) Disconnect or remove the battery.

3) Remove the gas tank, ignition coils, spark plug wires.

4) Disconnect electronic ignition or points.

5) Disconnect all hoses connected to the engine.

6) Loosen and disconnect the clutch cable.

7) Remove the airbox and carburetors.

8) Loosen and remove the exhaust headers.

9) Remove the shift lever, brake lever, and foot pegs on some bikes.

10) Begin removing the engine mounting bolts, keep track of where the go and how they’re assembled.

11) Remove the last mounting bolt and you’re ready to remove the engine

The engine will normally need to be removed and installed from one side of the frame – usually the side opposite the welded-on engine mounts.

As you lift the engine out and over the frame tubes, you may need to slant it slightly. On some motorcycles, laying the bike on its side and lifting the frame over the engine is easier.

If you do this, make careful to support the engine with some wood blocks.

When removing the engine from the frame, having an extra pair of hands might be really beneficial.

When you’re ready to put the engine back in the frame, reverse the disassembly order.

How to Clean Motorcycle Engine Fins

It’s an excellent time to clean the cylinder head fins and the bottom of the crankcase while the engine is removed and dismantled.
Getting into the nooks and crannies of the engine is a key component of a clean motorcycle if you’re going for a restored bike that appears like new.

When everything has been removed and the cases and covers are entirely empty, the outside of the engine is the easiest to clean.

Grease, grit, and road filth commonly accumulate on the engine fins and crankcase bottom. It becomes more difficult to remove over time as it heats up, cures, and builds up more.

To clean the engine’s fins, covers, and crankcases, follow these steps:

1) Apply some degreaser to break down the grime.

2) Use soft wire or nylon brushes to get into the corners and between the fins, and scrub.

3) A medium to high grit sandpaper can be used as well.

4) Use dental picks or pipe cleaners to get into hard to reach places

You might use a power washer or media blasting to clean the engine before repainting it. Just make sure nothing gets stuck in the oil passageways or on the mars and gasket mating surfaces.

 

 

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